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This page is run by volunteer contributors as a source of news for everyone interested in the birds of Lundy, in the Bristol Channel, UK.
If you have news to report, please consider signing up as a contributor or send in your sightings here.
See also the companion website The Birds of Lundy for comprehensive updates to the 2007 book of the same name.
Bird recording and ringing on Lundy are coordinated by the Lundy Field Society and general information about visiting the island can be found here.

Sunday, 18 November 2018

16th & 17th Nov – Blackcaps still on the move

The latest updates from Tony Taylor and Rebecca Taylor show that migrants are continuing to pass through in good numbers, even though we are now into the second half of November:

Friday 16th November

The main movements comprised 50 Redwings, 400 Starlings and 120 Chaffinches, with a supporting cast of Sparrowhawk, Merlin, Kestrel, Peregrines (the raptors often targeting passerine flocks in Lighthouse Field), the Great Spotted Woodpecker, a Chiffchaff, nine Blackcaps (with a surprisingly high total of 10 ringed during 15th/16th), a Fieldfare, two Goldfinches and a Linnet. A Great Northern Diver was in the Landing Bay, but a different bird to that seen recently, showing much more white on the head and neck.

Martin Thorne saw 30 Golden Plovers in flight over South West Field.

Saturday 17th November

Strong winds limited both ringing and birding but a single 20-foot mistnet in a sheltered corner delivered a trickle of birds including a second calendar year Sparrowhawk and a Brambling. Among  birds seen were a Woodcock, the Great Spotted Woodpecker (which Martin Thorne has observed using nestbox no. 5 in Millcombe), a Chiffchaff, three Blackcaps, a Goldcrest, 40 Redwings, six Fieldfares, two Song Thrushes, two Stonechats, 110 Chaffinches and two Linnets.

Female Great Spotted Woodpecker leaving nestbox no. 5 in Millcombe – a bit of a squeeze! 17 Nov © Martin Thorne 
A more conventional view of the woodpecker in Millcombe, 16 Nov © Martin Thorne

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